From the Board

By The People...

Of the people, for the people, by the people. These three ideals were framed in the Constitution adopted in 1789, but according to 21st-century Pamphleteer Carl Malamud, the actual history of America shows that they were adopted in three distinct phases spanning three centuries in time. Malamud explains all at the O'Reilly Gov 2.0 Summit in the 2nd day keynote, and in work he shares with CC0, "no rights reserved"...

Patent Trolls in the 21st Century

Moore's Law has been a powerful enabler of innovation because every 36-48 months you get twice the CPU cycles at half the price. In 8-12 years, Moore's law delivers 10x the performance at 1/10th the price, making the seemingly impossible relative cheap, if not free. Consequently, venture capitalists-even after the Internet bubble and the financial meltdown-largely prefer to invest in technology-driven companies in preference to almost anything else. Moore's Law simply opens up so many new business frontiers.

Except for one small problem...Patent Trolls, aka non-practicing entities.

Cartoon showing Microsoft colluding with patent trolls

White House Director of New Media speaks about Open Source

I'm participating at the O'Reilly Gov 2.0 Summit in Washington DC this week, and it is amazing to see the people that the O'Reilly conference team has brought together, both in terms of speakers and participants. In the afternoon, WAMU radio host Kojo Nnamdi interviewed Macon Phillips, the White House Director of New Media, revealing that both had a handle on the technologies reshaping American politics and concepts of American civic actions.

Legal Track at OSCON (from Mark Radcliffe)

Legal issues are very important for open source projects. We are providing free panels on open source legal issues at OSCON. These panels have been organized by Mark Radcliffe of DLA Piper and Allison Randal. The presentations will take place on Wednesday, July 22 at the San Jose Marriott in room Willow Glen 1. For more updated information, please see

A question of bias

According to Techworld, Jonathan Zuck of the Association for Competitive Technology (ACT) has recently accused the European Commission of having a bias in favor of open source. This is an interesting claim for a number of reasons, not least of which are the questions "who is the ACT?" and "what are they doing in the halls of the European Commission?". But the question of reported bias is also an interesting one, and characterizes on of the great philosophical and political challenges of our age.


Subscribe to From the Board