You are here

acoliver's blog

It isn't open source if it doesn't pass "The patch test".

I think most know by now that a license is insufficient to make something actually open source. The license just helps pass the sniff test. I use one other test which I like to call "The Patch Test".

Microsoft Loves Open Source

Somehow I missed that Microsoft loves Open Source. There is a reason I missed it. When Microsoft is not threatening to sue people for using/distributing open source they are setting up semi-secret consortiums to hamper the use of Open Source. Microsoft loves "embracing" open source. This "mixed IT" and (uni-directional) "interoperability" is frankly a silly ploy. I WISH Microsoft was sincere but actions speak louder than words.

A simple declaration about "Open Core"

Recently, there has been debate in the press about "Open Core". I don't care to debate the minor points but make a simple declaration:

Oh and one more thing...open source does support piracy...

And by my earlier criticism of the IIPA position that open source == piracy...there might be something to that. Feel free to copy and distribute any of the open source software I've ever written. Give it to a friend, a neighbor, copy it to whatever devices, run it, use it, rip it and enhance it. I promise...I won't call the cops on you. If that makes you a pirate....ahoy matey...

To Microsoft, Open Source means "Windows Encumbered"

One of the most interesting things to happen in the past couple of years, is Microsoft's embrace of Open Source. This means different things to various people I've spoken with at Microsoft. Some seem genuinely sincere. Some seem less so. What hasn't changed is Microsoft's behavior to the Open Source community at large.

Linux is now good enough for many end users

My activities in Open Source have paid for our house, car, etc etc (despite there being no such thing as an "open source business model"). However, I have never really actively attempted to convert my wife, Erica, to use Linux.

When you're in Open Source your error longevity is nearly eternal

When you have a startup you ego-surf a lot. It isn't for the normal reasons people ego surf (indeed there is something inside of me left over from my punk adolescence that dies a little every time I do this). It is for the reasons that PR firms ego search. To informally report how effective you are at making noise for your firm. In the process I discovered this vision document which explains why we (myself and Marcus Johnson) were creating a project that eventually became POI, a project hosted at Apache. I was curious so I looked around. It appears to me that this is a course on doing software the wrong way.

Open Source Business Conference Retrospective

Along with the Free and Open Source Developers European Meeting, the Open Source Business Conference was one of the two best conferences I've been to recently (I generally hate conferences). I got my geek on at: FOSDEM and actually enjoyed and learned from the technical sessions. Where OSBC is at the other end of the spectrum with business sessions, so I got my suit on.

How Open Source Is Your Open Source?

Michael DeHaan has an excellent post entitled "How Open Source Is Your Open Source?". I dare say it is his best post despite getting in a few (Linux) distro biased comments. He proposes a set of community standards that determine the real health and openness of Open Source. In my opinion, a major problem with OSI at the moment is that it perpetuates (mainly indeliberately) that a mere license makes something Open Source. In my view, an Open Source license is really the first step in making software Open Source.

Microsoft, Apache POI and the Open Specification Promise

I have been working with Sam Ramji and Robert Duffner from Microsoft, and I have been very pleased to resolve the issues that I had with the work they are funding for the Apache POI project. Not only has Microsoft addressed the concerns that I had with regards to patents and OOXML, but they have gone a step further and added the binary formats to the list.

Subscribe to RSS - acoliver's blog