Practical Open Source Needs You!

Our CFP for Practical Open Source Information (POSI) has been open for about a month, and we’re planning a unique, half-day event targeting organizations and individuals often left out in community programming that are looking for ‘nuts-and-bolts’ information about what using open source means in practice, from talks from speakers with extensive experience in the field.

 

This is the first such event we’ve planned, so to get the word out, we’ve been reaching out directly to a wide array of open source community members of all stripes -- strategists, activists, lawyers, developers -- to spread the word about our Call for Speakers, which closed on July 15th, 8:00 EDT.  We want this event to be a place where folks can find an accessible entry point into open source practices, learning from community members about best practices, common mistakes, and answers to topics as deceptively simple as choosing the right license for a project, so if that’s something you know about, we want to hear from you!

 

Submissions have trickled in over the past month, but we’d like to make sure that as many people as possible get to hear about both the Call and our event -- so please, share links to our event to people you think might be interested in joining us, either as attendees or speakers! We’re relying on the open source community to help us share this new, unique event widely, so, by all means, help us reach out.

 

Thanks, 

Vladimir Bejdo

Program Associate

To promote and protect open source software and communities...

For over 20 years the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has worked to raise awareness and adoption of open source software, and build bridges between open source communities of practice. As a global non-profit, the OSI champions software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition (OSD), and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement.

Open source software is made by many people and distributed under an OSD-compliant license which grants all the rights to use, study, change, and share the software in modified and unmodified form. Software freedom is essential to enabling community development of open source software.