Thank You for a Fantastic First POSI!

We’d like to take a moment to thank our community for making our event on Practical Open Source Information a resounding success -- with more than 300 attendees, 30 speakers, a brilliant keynote address from Heather Leson of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies about the role open source plays in humanitarian efforts, and three tracks, our half-day event proved to be a valuable space for many members of our community to come together and discuss a wide range of pressing issues affecting open source practitioners everywhere. (Recordings of all event talks and panels will be made available shortly!)

 

We’d like to thank our program committee members, Pam Chestek, Christine Lemmer-Webber, Sam Kimbrel, Justin Colannino and John Mark Walker for selecting our event’s final programming. We’d also like to thank our OSI staff members who made this event possible -- Deb Nicholson, Vladimir Bejdo, Betsy Waliszewski, Phyllis Dobbs, Jessica Iavarone and Stefano Maffulli -- and our volunteers, who played crucial roles in running the event itself -- Kenny Coyle, Sri Ramkrishna, Remy deCausemaker, and Salt Hale.

 

If you attended or spoke at POSI, please take a minute fill out the short survey we emailed to you, so we can make future events even better. Thank you all, once again, for making this event possible -- we couldn’t have done it without the support of people in the open source community like you!

To promote and protect open source software and communities...

For over 20 years the Open Source Initiative (OSI) has worked to raise awareness and adoption of open source software, and build bridges between open source communities of practice. As a global non-profit, the OSI champions software freedom in society through education, collaboration, and infrastructure, stewarding the Open Source Definition (OSD), and preventing abuse of the ideals and ethos inherent to the open source movement.

Open source software is made by many people and distributed under an OSD-compliant license which grants all the rights to use, study, change, and share the software in modified and unmodified form. Software freedom is essential to enabling community development of open source software.