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'Tis The Season (to donate to the OSI)

Most of you know me as President of the Open Source Initiative, but I am also Chair of the Fundraising Committee. Over the years we have raised monies large and small from companies large and small, public and private, and we have had great participation from individual donors as well. In fact, this year was probably a record in terms of the total number of different people supporting the OSI--which is cause alone to celebrate.

Announcement: Major Restructuring of OSI Mailing Lists

Dear OSI Community,

As part of our ongoing effort to improve transparency and encourage participation, the Open Source Initiative is announcing a major restructuring of our public mailing lists, effective immediately. Moving forward, OSI's public discussions of Open Source issues will be concentrated on three major mailing lists:

New Mailing Lists and Charters

Hi everyone,

As promised, we've dramatically expanded and rechartered the OSI mailing lists. In particular, we have split license review and general OSI issue discussions out from "license-discuss" list, to allow the latter to focus on maintaining the new Licensing FAQ.

We continue to work on several other process and website improvements. Stay tuned!
-- Ernie P.
OSI Board Observer

New Code of Conduct

Since there has been some confusion as of late, I've posted an updated Code of Conduct. Hopefully this (along with planned charter revisions) will improve our overall mailing list climate.

Give One, Get One, Then Some

This morning the Give One Get One program went live, and after reading the terms and conditions of the program, I was ready for not one, but two laptops. Why two? You can read my ( parent . thesis ) blog to find out. (And you should, after reading this one.)

Simple Public License (SimPL) approved

After a lengthy consideration, the Simple Public License (SimPL) has been added to the list of approved licenses. The concern was that because the SimPL is a reciprocal license, it could create its own ghetto of code unusable by any other project. However, because it contains language that allows relicensing under the GPL v2.0 or v3.0, this will not happen. That should give developers the confidence to adopt the SimPL without fear of marginalization.

The Maine Media-Arts Project

In my professoinal capacity, I spend most of my time talking with public and private sector executives about how they can use open source software to save millions (potentially billions) of dollars while replacing brittle and broken proprietary software with code that actually works. And I talk about how the values of the open source community promote the very innovation that their organizations and economies so desparately strive to achieve. But I am just as excited about the creativity and self-expression that open source can inspire, especially when it helps those who would otherwise have no voice to find, develop, and then use that voice.

Who Is Behind "Shared Source" Misinformation Campaign?

Last night I received a google alert about a new blog posting with a most misleading title. The title read "OSI Approves Microsoft's 'Shared Software' Licenses". This half-truth was paired with another half-truth: that I was President of the Portland-based Open Source Initiative. (The OSI is incorporated in California.)

This morning, I received another google alert from another blog posting with exactly the same article, but from an entirely different blog.

Metadata for the Common Man (or Woman)

In July I was honored to be appointed Visiting Scholar at SILS, the School of Information and Library Science and the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The Information and Library Science community and the Open Source community share many common passions, especially the belief that sharing knowledge is important and good work. And increasingly I see a shared fate for both communities...

When Disclosure is better than Disaster...ALWAYS

In a followup to a previous blog posting, I read in today's headlines that NASA has corrected their position and decided to disclose research that they had planned to destroy—a victory for transparency and for public safety.

The news report I read was from CNN.

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